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Over the last few weeks, my colt coral has grown to the point where it is starting to smother out other corals.  Rather than moveing it to another part of the aqarium, I decided to propagate it.  Once doing so, the corals that were suffering from lack of light are now doing fine again.  Here is a detailed description of how I successfully did so.


I purchased a colt coral about a month ago via mail order.  When placing it within my 37 gallon reef aquarium, it almost immediately opened up.  About three weeks after purchasing this colt coral it grew to the point where I either had to move the coral to another part of the aquarium or propagate it.   Since I have limited real estate within the aquarium do to the many corals within my aquarium taking up there own space, the best alternative was to propagate it.   This was my first experience with colt coral.  Let me tell you, this coral is extremely hardy and grows VERY FAST!  It seems to do well regardless of where you place it within the aquarium.  For lighting within my 37 gallon reef aquarium, I am using 4   55 watt power compact lights.  Two are 6100k daylight and the other two are 7100k attinic o3 bulbs.  All of these bulbs are made by Hamilton.   I am currently adding only Iodine to the aquarium.  I use Seachems Reef Plus as my Iodine Supplement.  Reef plus has worked very well for me in the past and I will continue to recommend it's use.

Propagating this coral is very easy.  I took a pair of sharp scizzors and trimmed the coral like I would an overgrown bush.  I placed the coral "fragments" in a small plastic bowl filled with reef water from the aquarium.  I then placed the coral fragments in a clear plastic bowl filled halfway with rather large pieces Caribsea substrate.  I placed the coral fragments under the Caribsea substrate and covered the top of the clear plastic bowl with bridal veil netting that I purchased at a local fabrics store.  I secured the bridal veil to the clear plastic bowl using a rubber band.  I left the coral fragments in the clear plastic bowl for 2 weeks.  During this time, the coral fragments had an opportunity to attach themselves to the Caribsea substrate.  I then took the coral fragments out of the clear plastic bowl and attached the host Caribsea substrate to other parts of my reef using super glue gel.  Super glue gel will not harm your corals and fish in any way. Make sure that you use a clear plastic bowl so that the light can penetrate the bowl and provide the coral with the much needed light that it requires.  


This is a picture of how I propagated my colt coral. I used a pair of sharp sizzors to trim my colt coral which had started to over power other corals within my 37 gallon reef aquarium. I then placed the new coral "fragments" in a clear plastic bowl filled half way with Caribsea substrate. Make sure to dry off your scizzors after each use. If you look closely, you will see that this pair of scizzors is starting to rust. Do it yourself for under $100.00

The original colt coral began to grow new polyps within a week after propagating it.  I will keep you abreast of how fast the coral grows out.

That's it.  I now have several of the colt coral species growing within my 37 gallon reef aquarium.  I will soon be moving some of the newly propagated species to other aquariums since I do not want to have too many of one species growing within any of my reef aquariums.


This is a picture of the clear plastic bowl that I placed my newly propagated colt fragment in. As you can see, I filled the bowl half way with Caribsea substrate which the coral will attach itself too. I then glue the substrate to my reef using super glue gel. Make sure that you use a clear plastic bowl so that the light can penetrate the bowl and provide the coral with the much needed light that it requires. Clear plastic propagation bowl

If you are interested in trading my propagated colt coral for another species, please send me an e-mail.  I now have several of this species and am looking to trade for others.  Propagating corals and trading them with hobbyists is a great way to save money on  filling your reef with inhabitants.   Also, propagated corals are much hardier than wild corals taken from the ocean since they have adapted to aquarium conditions.  My goal is to eventually fill all of my reef aquariums with corals that have never been exposed to the ocean.

 

Thanks to all of the hobbyists who have sent e-mails!   More to come.

 

The Coral Guy

Joe Swipes

 


Please e-mail me your comments/feedback on this site

joesreef@yahoo.com