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Hello and welcome to The Coral Guy’s Reef Inhabitants Page. Below are pictures of just some of the reef inhabitants in my aquariums along with both their common and scientific names. Currently, I am adding only Reef Plus (Seachem) and B-Ionic (ESV) to my aquarium per the companies instructions. For my make up water I am using a water dionizer by Aquarium Pharmaceuticals.

All of the corals listed on this page I have successfully been able to propagate. If you would like information on how to propagate these and many other corals, you can either refer to my Propagation Page or send me off a quick note and I will explain the process to you in detail.

This is a picture of some of my blue Zoanthis that I am keeping within my 37 gallon reef aquarium. This species is hardy, a fast grower, and very easy to propagate (what else could you ask for in a coral. They require a moderate amount of light and medium water current. Eventually, these Zoanthids will cover the entire reef plug and start to spread onto the rock. I glued the reef plug to the rock using super glue reef gel. Aquastick adhesive will also work. ”A

This is a picture of one of my leather corals commonly referred to as a Finger Leather Coral. This coral requires a moderate amount of light and strong water current. I placed this coral directly in the path of the water being pumped from one of my power heads to ensure enough water movement. When happy, this coral extends its polyps about ½ inch.

Periodically, this coral (along with many other leather corals) will stop extending its polyps and appear as if it’s dying. Most of the time, this is not the case. The coral will remain in this state for about a week and will shead a thin coat of what looks like skin,. Once the skin has been shed, the coral will again extend it’s polyps. This coral is easy tp propagate. For more information on how to propagate this and many other corals, please refer to my Propagation Page

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This is a picture of another one ofof my leather corals commonly referred to as a colt coral. This coral requires a moderate amount of light and moderate water current. This coral is a nice addition to any aquarium. This coral grows very fast and is easy to propagate. To propagate this coral, I cut a branch off of the stalk and place it in a small plastic bowl with small sea shells on the bottom. Within a couple of weeks, the frag will attach itself to one of the shells. I will then glue the shell to one of my rocks using either super glue gel or aquastick adhesive.

When placing any frag into a small plastic bowl for propagation, make sure that the coral is still receiving the proper amount of water current. To ensure this, I place the bowl in the direct path of the water being pumped from one of my powerheads and tilt the bowl slightly. Also, make sure that the coral is still receiving the proper amount of light while in the bowl.

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This is a picture of one of my pulsing xenia. I have several variations and colors of this species within my reef aquariums. Xenia require stong light and water movement. Xenia is a very easy species to propagate. It is ok to remove this coral from the aquarium when propagating. I recommend that you so because I’ve heard from more than one hobbyist that xenia expel a chemical when propagating them that if not washed off of the stalk and the frag will cause harm to your other corals.

Xenia are very sensitive to the temperature of the water. Make sure that the temperature of your aquarium is between 76 to 80 degrees if you chose to keep this species. I’ve heard stories of xenia “Crashing” once the temperature of the aquarium reached 82 degrees. Be extremely conscious of the water temperature in you aquarium during the summer months. If necessary, add a chiller to the aquarium to prevent your water temperature from increasing. You can make an inexpensive chiller yourself using an old dorm refrigerator. To learn how to do so, please refer to my Do it Yourself page.

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This is a picture of some of the star polys within my 37 gallon reef aquarium. This species is a nice additon to any aquarium. This species requires low to moderate amout of light and medium water movement. The colors of these star polyps are green, yellow, and brown. This species is very easy to propagate. To do so, take a sharp razor blade and cut the purple skin into strips and carefully remove the strips from the rock. Glue the strips to other pieces of rock using super glue gel. Eventually, the entire rock will be covered with star polys.

Very soon, I am going to cut a strip of brown, yellow, and green star polys and glue them onto the same rock creating a tri-colored star polyp rock. This is the true beauty of being able to propagate corals. You can create rocks covered with variations of species that would be virtually impossible to find in the wild.

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This is a picture of some of the green hairy mushrooms within my 37 gallon reef aquarium. They require a moderate amount of light and water movement. These mushrooms are a nice addition to any reef aquarium. They grow very fast and are extremely hardy. I use the plastic bowl method to propagate this species. Frequently, this species will create it’s own babies. I use a sharp razorblade or pair of sizzors to cut frags off of the mother colony. When fragging the mother colony, the coral will expel something that looks a lot like dental floss. Don’t worry, this “dental floss” will not harm any of your corals or fish (at least, it has never harmed any of my species).

Be careful not to place this species next to corals that do not grow upward (such as star polyps). This species will grow and eventually smother out certain corals that surround it.

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This is a picture of the bubble coral in my 37 gallon reef aquarium. It is a rather hardy coral, requires relatively low light and medium water current. It seems to really like when I feed my fish spiuralina. The bubbles really start to expand and it has small tenticles that extend and move about.

I have heard about people propagating this coral although I have not found any approach towards doing so. If you know how to propagate this coral, please let me know. I have also read that on occasion, this coral releases several eggs into the aquarium although I have not seen this happen with this coral yet. If you have had a bubble coral that released eggs, please let me know what happend with the eggs (if the grew into small corals, died off, etc.). Your feedback on bubble coral propagation would be greatly appreciated.

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This is a picture of the Yellow Tang in my aquarium. I have had it now for about 7 months and this guy is doing great. I mostly feed him seaweed and he absolutely loves it. It keeps him nice and fat. It also helps to keep his vibrant corals. His color is so intense that he almost seems to glow when under my power compact lighting.

He has not been an aggressive fish for me. He is rather large for my 37 gallon aquarium however, he has never knocked over a coral on me. When he swims, he appears as if to be making a conscious effort not to do so. He is a rather shy fisk. He will spend about half of his time hiding behind rocks and the other half swimming around the aquarium searching for seaweed.

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This is a picture of my seabae clown. I’ve had this fish for about 1 ½ years and he still continues to thrive in my aquarium. Some hobbyists feel that you need a host anemone in order to keep this fish alive for an extended period oft time. I have found that this is not the case. You can keep a seabae (or any other type of anemone fish for that matter) in an aquarium for an extended period of time without a host anemone.

Clown fish are a great addition to any aquarium. They are docile and extremely hardy. I do not have a host anemone for this fish because I have read in several publications that they are extremely hard to keep for an extended period of time. I am thinking about adding a host anemone and taking on the challenge because I think that it is so neat to see these fish play within the anemone.

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This is a picture of one of the hermit crabs within my 60 gallon reef aquarium. I purchased several of these hermits along with several different types of snails from G.A.R.F . The refer to the hermit/snail packages that they sell as Reef Janitors. These guys do an extremely good job of getting rid of proble algae.

G.A.R.F has different Reef Janitor packages based on the type of alge that is growing within your aquarium. In my case, I had an extremely bad diatom algae bloom (typical for a recently established aquarium).

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This is a picture of one of the diatom algae eating snails that goes to work within my 60 gallon reef aquarium. These guys are extremely efficient. I rarely have to ever clean the inside of my tank walls. They also clean the heck out of my live Aragorock.

Once placing these guys within your aquarium, they immediately go to work cleaning your aquarium. I could not believe how fast they cleared up my diatom algae problem.

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Please e-mail me your comments/feedback on this site

joesreef@yahoo.com

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